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Boulder Immigration And Naturalization Law Blog

How can a U visa impact your family?

As someone who entered the country through unconventional methods, you may face numerous anxieties on a daily basis. Issues that could seem negligible to a citizen or green card holder may seem insurmountable to you as an undocumented immigrant. Illness, injury or even crimes committed against you may leave you more fearful as the threat of deportation may loom if you choose to seek help. These fears may amplify even more if you have children you hope to protect.

What does an adjustment of status mean for me?

As you go through the process of becoming a naturalized citizen of the United States, you go through several statuses. When you first arrive in the United States, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services considers you as a non-immigrant or parolee (temporary). Once you go through the admissions and inspection process, you could become eligible for the "adjustment of status" process whereby you become a permanent resident (obtain your green card).

Getting married in America: Fiancé visas and your rights

Individuals who are working toward bringing a fiancé to the United States may have serious concerns about how announcements and changes made by the new administration could affect this process. While it may seem more complicated than ever before, with the right legal assistance, you can secure the appropriate fiancé visa, bring your loved one home to Colorado and move forward with your wedding plans.

Escaping to a brighter future

If you have suffered torture or persecution in your home country, you may be making plans to escape. Perhaps you are thinking of coming to the United States and seeking asylum. If this is your plan, there are some important things to know before you risk your life escaping your situation.

Domestic violence victims can find relief through VAWA

Domestic violence is a serious problem in the United States. However, not everyone affected by domestic violence is a U.S. citizen. If you are facing violence at home, but are worried that reporting it could cause problems for your immigration status, you may have options.

The Future Of DACA Under Donald Trump

When President Obama created the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program in 2012, many people felt a wave of relief wash over them. DACA has allowed roughly 742,000 people who were brought to the U.S. as minors to seek higher education, obtain meaningful work that pays a fair wage, and stop worrying about being imminently deported from the country they call home.

In light of the recent election, however, many people in Colorado are living in fear, again, wondering whether the next president will continue to allow them to live in the U.S.

U.S. Citizenship test: 5 Common questions

In the last decade, the United States has welcomed over 6.6 million citizens through the process of naturalization. Immigrants seeking citizenship must first meet several requirements such as living in the United States as a permanent resident for five years, being physically present in the country for the last 30 months, and being able to speak and write English. Once these requirements are met, the applicant must file a naturalization application, attend an interview and pass the citizenship test. After years of preparation, it is normal to approach the test date with anxiety or apprehension, and you may have questions about the test itself. Preparation is the key to success. Following are answers to five common questions about the citizenship test.

Should you apply for a K-1 fiancé(e) visa or marriage-based Visa?

When you're in love with a non-U.S. citizen, you have options for bringing them to the U.S. The fiancé(e) visa is a well-known option, but you can also consider marrying first then obtaining a marriage visa. Explore the pros and cons of each to decide what's right for you and your fiancé(e).

Completing the I-918 petition for a U Visa

In the United States, everyone has the right to be safe and live a life free from violence. In 2000, the U visa was put into place as part of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act. It is meant to help protect non-U.S. citizens who have suffered abuse, sexual assault, involuntary servitude, human trafficking and other serious crimes.

Answers to Your Green Card Renewal Questions

For an issue as important as renewing your green card, which allows you to legally reside in the United States, always keep in mind that the best action you can take is to find and consult with an attorney. A competent attorney can guide you through the process of renewing your green card, making it as simple as possible and avoiding mistakes that could result in a denial. Following are answers to several common questions about green card renewal:

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