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Does your immigration problem relate to one of these myths?

When you first came to Colorado, you were clinging to the hope that the United States was a safe place where you could improve your quality of life. Although you faced challenges along the way, you built a strong foundation and began raising a family while earning regular income and contributing to your community. Through it all, you were always a bit worried that somehow, someday, it would all come tumbling down and some type of problem regarding your immigration status would arise when you least expected it.

Immigration is definitely one of the most controversial topics of discussion in this nation. The trouble is, what many people think versus the reality of the situation are often two entirely different things. There are many myths circulating regarding both documented and undocumented immigrants and their families. No two situations are exactly the same; however, if you're currently facing a particular obstacle having to do with your status, it may help to be aware of some of the most common immigration misconceptions.

True or false?

People in Colorado and other states get their information regarding immigration in various ways. Some follow online news sources, while others work in a political or legal field related to the topic. There are also those, however, who base their opinions on what they hear from others rather than actual statistics or valid informational sources. Some of the biggest myths about immigrants in the United States are below:

  • Most of the immigrants in this country sneaked across its borders illegally.
  • Immigrants often take citizens' jobs away from them.
  • Many immigrants come to the United States so they can live for free on government-provided assistance.
  • Not many immigrants are willing to learn to speak English.
  • Most immigrants have no desire to become naturalized citizens.

The reality is that each of these statements contains misguided information. For people like you, who work hard to raise respectful, hard-working children and give back to your community in any way you can, it can be very upsetting to be received with misperception and/or persecution regarding your immigration status.

Problems that may arise

The truth is, many people enter the United States legally, then wind up in challenging situations when a clerical error occurs or something goes wrong with a visa or other temporary residence situation. Some immigrants share frightening stories about detainment and threats of deportation. Many live in fear for their own safety and their children's well-beings. Immigrants and their families often face the following problems:

  • Many immigrants wanting to obtain gainful employment in the United States become victims of people committing fraud or other acts of deception related to employment visa programs.
  • Some are separated from their families and locked up in detention centers when situations like getting pulled over for minor traffic violations go awry.
  • Immigrant parents often face challenges and legal problems related to their children's education.
  • Obtaining urgent medical care is often difficult for undocumented immigrants.

No one wants to live in fear. In fact, many immigrants come to the United States in the first place because they are fleeing imminent violence and extreme poverty makes them very afraid. There are many immigrant advocates who work hard to dispel the myths while supporting people from other countries who only want what's best for their families.

If you're currently facing a problem in Colorado in connection with your immigration status, you can reach out for support through the law office of an experienced immigration attorney. There are often resources and options available to help you resolve a particular issue and keep your family together.

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