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Immigration interview questions could cover knowledge of country

Immigration authorities may want to measure a person's knowledge of the United States. To prepare for such questions, people in California who are pursuing documentation to live in the country or seeking citizenship should become familiar with basic facts about the nation and its regions and political leadership.

An interviewer might want to know if the applicant can demonstrate basic knowledge about how many states form the country. A person should be prepared to name as many states as possible. The capital of the nation will likely come up as well. An interviewee should know where the capital is located and when it was established as the nation's capital.

In addition to knowing that the nation's leader is called the president, an interviewee needs to know the specific name of the person currently holding the office. The name given to the official residence of the president should be memorized as well. Questions about the U.S. flag could require a person to describe its colors, shapes and symbolism. The lyrics and origin of the national anthem should also be committed to memory. Correct answers to questions about the country could improve a person's chance of being perceived as enthusiastic about the United States.

Before a person approaches immigration authorities, a consultation with an attorney could provide information about rights within the system. An attorney who practices immigration law could review the person's documentation and strive to prepare immigration paperwork as completely as possible. A lawyer's guidance might prevent delays or denials caused by missing paperwork. The person could also gain insights about what questions authorities might ask and have a chance to practice for an interview with an attorney. If problems arise, a lawyer could file an appeal and try to win reconsideration of a person's immigration case.

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