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What should you know about the naturalization test?

On Behalf of | Sep 4, 2020 | Naturalization/Citizenship

For work purposes, in pursuit of asylum or for any other number of reasons, you may wish to achieve United States citizenship. With few exceptions and among other steps, you must complete an interview and pass an exam before receiving U.S. citizenship. Failing to pass the naturalization interview and exam may set you back in your pursuit of gaining legal status as a U.S. citizen.

As you move through the naturalization process, knowing how to prepare for your interview and English and civics tests may help alleviate some of your stresses.

The English test

According to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, three components make up the naturalization test’s English section – speaking, reading and writing. During the interview portion, the USCIS officer will evaluate your English-speaking ability. The interviewer may review the supporting documentation you submit with your application, as well as ask you questions about the information you provided.

For the reading and writing portions, the interviewer will ask you to read aloud one of three sample sentences and to write out one of three sample sentences. Should you fail any portion of the English exam, you may retake it once.

The civics test

For your civics test, the interviewer will ask you up to 10 questions from a list of 100. These questions relate to the history and the government of the U.S. To pass, you must accurately answer at least six of the questions asked. Should you fail to answer the six questions correctly, you have another opportunity to retake this portion within 60 to 90 days from your initial naturalization interview.