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Becoming a naturalized citizen

On Behalf of | Dec 16, 2019 | Naturalization/Citizenship

Everyone has different reasons for coming to Colorado from another country. Yours may have been to pursue new professional or academic opportunities, to be closer to family and friends, or because you simply like the area. Whatever your reasons, after remaining here for an extended period of time, the topic of seeking citizenship will likely come up. Many in your position have come to us here at Ramos Immigration Law asking what are some of the potential benefits of becoming a naturalized citizen (as opposed to remaining a legal permanent resident), and how can one who is interested initiate the process.

Your ability to remain in the U.S. often does not depend on your citizenship status; why, then, would you want to become a citizen? There are indeed some benefits unique to citizenship. These include:

  • Not having to worry about maintaining a green card (or the threat of deportation)
  • Being able to travel both to and from the country more easily
  • No concerns about your loss of status after spending an extended period of time out of the country
  • Easier access to visas to have your family join you here

If your time in the U.S. has inspired you to try to make a difference in your community, then being a citizen also allows you to run for public office.

If your goal is to become a citizen, you should know the requirements. According to the Office of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, you must be at least 18 years old, have lived in the U.S. as an LPR for at least five years (the last 3 months of which must have been spent in your current USCIS district), and demonstrate an attachment by passing the USCIS’s required tests.

More information on seeking citizenship can be found throughout our site.