We are open and available.  However, due to precautions related to COVID-19, we are temporarily unavailable for in-person consultations or meetings. We are accepting payments and documents ONLY at our Longmont location and electronically, and we have expanded our options for remote consultations and meetings. Our Aurora office is temporarily unstaffed and not accepting payments or documents. Please call or email us to schedule a phone consultation, video conference, or for assistance with submitting documents and payments.
  1. Home
  2.  – 
  3. Family Immigration
  4.  – Family immigration courts put immigrants in danger

Family immigration courts put immigrants in danger

On Behalf of | Feb 8, 2020 | Family Immigration

Ten immigration courts in the country were instructed by the Department of Justice earlier this year. They got tasked with speeding up the hearing of the matters relating to families who are seeking asylum on the United States soil. Following the directive, there are a series of trials that got divided into groups. The groupings have been taken up in Denver to aid in deciding the cases within less than a year.

Is fastening the hearing process fair? In late October, last year, Judge Alison Kane presided over cases concerning dozens of families. The hearing lasted for less than thirty minutes. On the sheets of paper in the courtroom, the countries of origin of these families included Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. However, immigration advocates argue that the cases that get decided in months may not possibly enable the evidence to get fully heard. Thus, most families who have valid claims get put in danger.

During the run-up before the midterm elections, President Donald Trump insisted on the anti-immigrant policies. Additionally, he demanded that they should deploy the military troops to the Mexico-U.S border. Similarly, his declaration threatened the constitutional rights to citizenship of most of the people who may have been born on U.S soil. However, the move to suspend the asylum rights for individuals who are illegally crossing the southern border may get challenged in court by the American Civil Liberties Union.

Does the asylum seekers show up in court for their trial? According to Trump, they never show up. However, the statistics, according to the Justice Department disowns Trump’s proclamation. Their statistics show that last year, close to 89 percent of these asylum seekers showed up for their trials.