We are open and available.  However, due to precautions related to COVID-19, we are temporarily unavailable for in-person consultations or meetings. We are accepting payments and documents ONLY at our Longmont location and electronically, and we have expanded our options for remote consultations and meetings. Our Aurora office is temporarily unstaffed and not accepting payments or documents. Please call or email us to schedule a phone consultation, video conference, or for assistance with submitting documents and payments.
  1. Home
  2.  – 
  3. Firm News
  4.  – Things to remember if you are detained for immigration issues

Things to remember if you are detained for immigration issues

| Jun 24, 2020 | Firm News

The United Nations reported that over 46 million immigrants live in America. The country’s immigrant population is about four times more than the next country’s total.

The American Immigration Council reports that almost 550,000 immigrants live here. About half are naturalized citizens. Those that are not (or who are undocumented), there are worries about being stopped. That could lead to detainment and deportation (removal from the country).

What you need to know if you are stopped or detained

There are things to remember if you or a family member has been detained for immigration issues. Knowing your rights can help you protect and support your rights.

There are things to remember that can help support your rights:

  • Watch what you say. You’ve heard it before, but it is true. Anything you say can be used against you. Do not share information with anyone but your attorney.
  • You have the right to remain silent. You have the right to remain silent and to have an attorney present for questioning. If you want to remain silent, say it out loud.
  • Carry your U.S. identification and copies of your immigration documents. Do not carry false documents or documents from another country.
  • Do not run from officers or get physical with them.
  • Do not sign anything before speaking to your attorney.

Be prepared and know your rights

Preparation now can prevent more serious issues later. That is especially true if you or a family member has immigration concerns. Know you’re your rights and have a plan in place to protect your rights if your immigration status is challenged. That could impact your future.