We are open and available.  However, due to precautions related to COVID-19, we are temporarily unavailable for in-person consultations or meetings. We are accepting payments and documents ONLY at our Longmont location and electronically, and we have expanded our options for remote consultations and meetings. Our Aurora office is temporarily unstaffed and not accepting payments or documents. Please call or email us to schedule a phone consultation, video conference, or for assistance with submitting documents and payments.
  1. Home
  2.  – 
  3. Immigration Law
  4.  – Potential USCIS furlough could delay immigration

Potential USCIS furlough could delay immigration

On Behalf of | Aug 12, 2020 | Immigration Law

Current events have stalled, derailed and halted business in Colorado and the world over. It looks as though federal immigration agencies could experience setbacks, too. Delayed stimulus package negotiations could force the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services to furlough a majority of its workforce, reports CNN. 

Those who desire to immigrate to the U.S. must make themselves aware of potential setbacks and how to respond to them. Staying updated and working with experienced immigration professionals helps immigrants get ahead and stay ahead of complications. 

Budget shortfalls

The reason for the USCIS potentially furloughing a majority of its employees is that without a substantial injection of funds, it cannot keep the immigration system up and running. The federal agency took more than a few hits under the current presidential administration, making it more difficult to apply for immigration benefits. Without financial assistance, not only may those hoping to enter the U.S. feel the sting, but so may the furloughed civil servants. 

Assurances from Congress

The previous date for furloughing USCIS employees was early August, but that pushed back to late August after Congress made assurances that the agency would receive funding. With a drastically reduced workforce, those hoping to immigrate to the U.S. should expect longer processing times than they currently experience. Besides extended processing periods, the USCIS chief counsel expects a deluge of filings, owed to a new fee regulation. 

Wait and see

As of this writing, it is uncertain whether the USCIS must furlough employees. Also, the current presidential administration may have intentions to force the USCIS to reduce its workforce. Immigration applicants must have a solid timeline of how long they can expect the immigration process to take and potential complicating factors.