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Budget-based immigration reform dies before reaching the Senate

On Behalf of | Dec 17, 2021 | Immigration Law

Federal lawmakers constantly adjust and update immigration policies to reflect current social and political concerns. Sometimes, it is far easier than other times to enter the country. In the last year, lawmakers and immigration officials have eased certain restrictive rules that negatively impacted immigrants.

However, there are still tens of thousands of people in the United States and living abroad who would benefit from changes to current immigration practices. Recently, there was a push for substantial immigration reforms as part of a budget reconciliation bill.

Attaching reform to other laws doesn’t always work

The House of Representatives attached certain immigration policies to an important budget bill. Unfortunately, decision-makers in the Senate have determined that those policies do not belong in the budget bill because their implication extends far beyond mere budgetary concerns.

Although lawmakers will adjust the budget bill and move forward with managing the country’s finances for the upcoming year, the possible immigration reforms people had hoped for will not be part of that bill. 

What were the potential immigration changes?

Some of the reforms included in the early plans of the budget bill included a couple of important immigration changes. One of these changes was the decision to add a parole program for undocumented immigrants.

Those who have been in the country without the right paperwork for some time could qualify for a sort of immigration parole under the suggested program. Provided that these immigrants complied with certain requirements, they could potentially stay in the country and then move forward with immigration proceedings.

The reforms would have also changed what happens to unissued green cards at the end of the calendar year. It would have allowed the federal government to tap into that significant number of unissued immigration documents to allow more people into the country later.

2022 will likely see more immigration reform attempts

While passing these significant reforms as part of the budget reconciliation bill did not succeed, it is likely that there will be more attempts to change immigration laws in the United States. Of these policies shift, some people will be in a better position to enter the United States or sponsor family members for immigration.

Keeping yourself informed about immigration laws can hope you make the most of the existing programs.